Famous People

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Archive for the ‘Famous Speeches’ Category

Chris Dodd, John Edwards, Hillary Rodham Clinton

Posted by quotes on July 14, 2007

Dodd knocks Edwards, Clinton for trying to limit debates

SALT LAKE CITY — Connecticut Sen. Chris Dodd took issue Saturday with comments John Edwards and Hillary Rodham Clinton were overheard making on limiting the number of Democrats in presidential debates.

“I’d remind them that the mic is always on,” Dodd told reporters Saturday after addressing a state convention of Utah Democrats.

“Celebrity and money are not going to decide this race,” he said. “People take some offense at it in these early primary and caucus states.”

Edwards, a former North Carolina senator, and New York Sen. Clinton were overheard by broadcast microphones after an NAACP forum in Detroit on Thursday, saying that debates should be limited to only a handful of candidates.

“We should try to have a more serious and a smaller group,” Edwards said, and Clinton agreed.

“Our guys should talk,” Clinton said, complaining the format had “trivialized” the discussion.

http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/connecticut/ny-bc-ct–dodd-utah0714jul14,0,783187.story?coll=ny-region-apconnecticut

Posted in Celebrities, Celebrity, Chris Dodd, Famous, Famous People, Famous Person, Famous Quotes, Famous Speeches, Hillary Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clinton, John Edwards, People, Political, Politics, Quotes | 1 Comment »

Famous People – Famous People of Canada

Posted by quotes on January 14, 2007

Famous People

Biographies of Famous People of Canada

Here is a very interesting resource:

Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online

This site has biographies of many people who were involved in the history and development of Canada.  Many of these Canadians are not really that famous but there are some very famous Canadians among the lot.

Here is part of a biography as an example:

Further into this biography, it appears to me that John became what we would call a pirate today.

ABRAHAM, JOHN, governor of Port Nelson; fl. 1672–89.

He joined the HBC about 1672 and served in James Bay 1672–75 and 1676–78 under Governor Charles Bayly, against whom he brought charges of mismanagement. In 1679 Abraham was appointed second to John Nixon, Bayly’s successor and although he absconded with an advance of salary at sailing time, he was engaged in 1681 as mate of the Diligence (Capt. Nehemiah Walker) and wintered in James Bay.

Despite Nixon’s criticisms of him, Abraham was promoted captain of the George in 1683, his destination being Port Nelson, where Governor John Bridgar had gone in 1682 to establish a fort. En route Abraham assisted Nehemiah Walker to capture the interloper Expectation and, on arrival, finding that the Company’s post had been destroyed and that Bridgar, with Benjamin Gillam* the New England interloper, had been captured and taken to Quebec by Radisson* and Chouart Des Groseilliers, he assumed command. After a winter spent harassing and competing with Jean-Baptiste Chouart, Des Groseilliers’s son, Abraham was homeward-bound when he received a commission as governor of Port Nelson. He returned and during his first weeks of office York Fort was built under George Geyer’s supervision and an attack, made by the newly arrived M. de Bermen* de La Martinière of the Compagnie du Nord, was repulsed. After a winter of friction the French withdrew in 1685.

Read more about ABRAHAM, JOHN here.

Posted in Biographies, Biography, Canada, Canadian, Celebrities, Celebrity, Dictionary, Famous, Famous People, Famous Quotes, Famous Speeches, History, People, Pirate, Pirates, Quotes, Reference, Research, Speeches | Leave a Comment »

Famous People – Edmund Burke

Posted by quotes on January 13, 2007

Famous People – Edmund Burke

“The only thing necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing.”

This famous quote was from British statesman Edmund Burke, who was born yesterday, January 12, 1729.

Considered the most influential orator in the House of Commons, Burke stands out in history, for, as a member of the British Parliament, he defended the rights of the American colonies and strongly opposed the slave trade.  

Edmund Burke stated: “What is liberty without…virtue? It is…madness, without restraint. Men are qualified for liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites.”

Posted in Biography, Edmund Burke, Famous, Famous People, Famous Quotes, Famous Speeches, History, Opinion Driver, People, Quotes, Reference, Research, Speeches | Leave a Comment »

Famous People – George S. Patton Quotes

Posted by quotes on November 13, 2006

George S. Patton Quotes

“Always do everything you ask of those you command.”
- George S. Patton, Jr. (1885-1945) US general

“A piece of spaghetti or a military unit can only be led from the front end.”
- George S. Patton, Jr. (1885-1945) US general

“A pint of sweat, saves a gallon of blood.”
- George S. Patton, Jr. (1885-1945) US general

“Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.”
- George S. Patton, Jr. (1885-1945) US general

Posted in Famous, Famous People, Famous Quotes, Famous Speeches, History, People, Quotes, Reference, Research, Speeches | Leave a Comment »

Inaugural Addresses of some of the US Presidents

Posted by quotes on October 19, 2006

Famous Speeches – Herbert Hoover – Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

THIS occasion is not alone the administration of the most sacred oath which can be assumed by an American citizen. It is a dedication and consecration under God to the highest office in service of our people. I assume this trust in the humility of knowledge that only through the guidance of Almighty Providence can I hope to discharge its ever-increasing burdens.

It is in keeping with tradition throughout our history that I should express simply and directly the opinions which I hold concerning some of the matters of present importance.
Famous Speeches – Calvin Coolidge – Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

NO one can contemplate current conditions without finding much that is satisfying and still more that is encouraging. Our own country is leading the world in the general readjustment to the results of the great conflict. Many of its burdens will bear heavily upon us for years, and the secondary and indirect effects we must expect to experience for some time. But we are beginning to comprehend more definitely what course should be pursued, what remedies ought to be applied, what actions should be taken for our deliverance, and are clearly manifesting a determined will faithfully and conscientiously to adopt these methods of relief. Already we have sufficiently rearranged our domestic affairs so that confidence has returned, business has revived, and we appear to be entering an era of prosperity which is gradually reaching into every part of the Nation. Realizing that we can not live unto ourselves alone, we have contributed of our resources and our counsel to the relief of the suffering and the settlement of the disputes among the European nations. Because of what America is and what America has done, a firmer courage, a higher hope, inspires the heart of all humanity.

Famous Speeches – Warren G. Harding – Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

WHEN one surveys the world about him after the great storm, noting the marks of destruction and yet rejoicing in the ruggedness of the things which withstood it, if he is an American he breathes the clarified atmosphere with a strange mingling of regret and new hope. We have seen a world passion spend its fury, but we contemplate our Republic unshaken, and hold our civilization secure. Liberty—liberty within the law—and civilization are inseparable, and though both were threatened we find them now secure; and there comes to Americans the profound assurance that our representative government is the highest expression and surest guaranty of both.

Standing in this presence, mindful of the solemnity of this occasion, feeling the emotions which no one may know until he senses the great weight of responsibility for himself, I must utter my belief in the divine inspiration of the founding fathers. Surely there must have been God’s intent in the making of this new-world Republic. Ours is an organic law which had but one ambiguity, and we saw that effaced in a baptism of sacrifice and blood, with union maintained, the Nation supreme, and its concord inspiring. We have seen the world rivet its hopeful gaze on the great truths on which the founders wrought. We have seen civil, human, and religious liberty verified and glorified. In the beginning the Old World scoffed at our experiment; today our foundations of political and social belief stand unshaken, a precious inheritance to ourselves, an inspiring example of freedom and civilization to all mankind. Let us express renewed and strengthened devotion, in grateful reverence for the immortal beginning, and utter our confidence in the supreme fulfillment.

Famous Speeches – Woodrow Wilson – Second Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

WHEN one surveys the world about him after the great storm, noting the marks of destruction and yet rejoicing in the ruggedness of the things which withstood it, if he is an American he breathes the clarified atmosphere with a strange mingling of regret and new hope. We have seen a world passion spend its fury, but we contemplate our Republic unshaken, and hold our civilization secure. Liberty—liberty within the law—and civilization are inseparable, and though both were threatened we find them now secure; and there comes to Americans the profound assurance that our representative government is the highest expression and surest guaranty of both.

Standing in this presence, mindful of the solemnity of this occasion, feeling the emotions which no one may know until he senses the great weight of responsibility for himself, I must utter my belief in the divine inspiration of the founding fathers. Surely there must have been God’s intent in the making of this new-world Republic. Ours is an organic law which had but one ambiguity, and we saw that effaced in a baptism of sacrifice and blood, with union maintained, the Nation supreme, and its concord inspiring. We have seen the world rivet its hopeful gaze on the great truths on which the founders wrought. We have seen civil, human, and religious liberty verified and glorified. In the beginning the Old World scoffed at our experiment; today our foundations of political and social belief stand unshaken, a precious inheritance to ourselves, an inspiring example of freedom and civilization to all mankind. Let us express renewed and strengthened devotion, in grateful reverence for the immortal beginning, and utter our confidence in the supreme fulfillment.

 Famous Speeches – Woodrow Wilson – First Inaugural Address

THERE has been a change of government. It began two years ago, when the House of Representatives became Democratic by a decisive majority. It has now been completed. The Senate about to assemble will also be Democratic. The offices of President and Vice-President have been put into the hands of Democrats. What does the change mean? That is the question that is uppermost in our minds to-day. That is the question I am going to try to answer, in order, if I may, to interpret the occasion.

It means much more than the mere success of a party. The success of a party means little except when the Nation is using that party for a large and definite purpose. No one can mistake the purpose for which the Nation now seeks to use the Democratic Party. It seeks to use it to interpret a change in its own plans and point of view. Some old things with which we had grown familiar, and which had begun to creep into the very habit of our thought and of our lives, have altered their aspect as we have latterly looked critically upon them, with fresh, awakened eyes; have dropped their disguises and shown themselves alien and sinister. Some new things, as we look frankly upon them, willing to comprehend their real character, have come to assume the aspect of things long believed in and familiar, stuff of our own convictions. We have been refreshed by a new insight into our own life.

More Presidential Quotes

Posted in Biography, Famous, Famous People, Famous Quotes, Famous Speeches, History, Inaugural Address, People, Presidential Quotes, Presidents, Quotes, Reference, Research, Speeches | Leave a Comment »

 
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