Famous People

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Archive for August, 2006

Famous Speeches – Theodore Roosevelt – Inaugural Address – Saturday, March 4, 1905

Posted by quotes on August 29, 2006

Famous Speeches – Theodore Roosevelt – Inaugural Address – Saturday, March 4, 1905
MY fellow-citizens, no people on earth have more cause to be thankful than ours, and this is said reverently, in no spirit of boastfulness in our own strength, but with gratitude to the Giver of Good who has blessed us with the conditions which have enabled us to achieve so large a measure of well-being and of happiness. To us as a people it has been granted to lay the foundations of our national life in a new continent. We are the heirs of the ages, and yet we have had to pay few of the penalties which in old countries are exacted by the dead hand of a bygone civilization. We have not been obliged to fight for our existence against any alien race; and yet our life has called for the vigor and effort without which the manlier and hardier virtues wither away. Under such conditions it would be our own fault if we failed; and the success which we have had in the past, the success which we confidently believe the future will bring, should cause in us no feeling of vainglory, but rather a deep and abiding realization of all which life has offered us; a full acknowledgment of the responsibility which is ours; and a fixed determination to show that under a free government a mighty people can thrive best, alike as regards the things of the body and the things of the soul.

Much has been given us, and much will rightfully be expected from us. We have duties to others and duties to ourselves; and we can shirk neither. We have become a great nation, forced by the fact of its greatness into relations with the other nations of the earth, and we must behave as beseems a people with such responsibilities. Toward all other nations, large and small, our attitude must be one of cordial and sincere friendship. We must show not only in our words, but in our deeds, that we are earnestly desirous of securing their good will by acting toward them in a spirit of just and generous recognition of all their rights. But justice and generosity in a nation, as in an individual, count most when shown not by the weak but by the strong. While ever careful to refrain from wrongdoing others, we must be no less insistent that we are not wronged ourselves. We wish peace, but we wish the peace of justice, the peace of righteousness. We wish it because we think it is right and not because we are afraid. No weak nation that acts manfully and justly should ever have cause to fear us, and no strong power should ever be able to single us out as a subject for insolent aggression.

Our relations with the other powers of the world are important; but still more important are our relations among ourselves. Such growth in wealth, in population, and in power as this nation has seen during the century and a quarter of its national life is inevitably accompanied by a like growth in the problems which are ever before every nation that rises to greatness. Power invariably means both responsibility and danger. Our forefathers faced certain perils which we have outgrown. We now face other perils, the very existence of which it was impossible that they should foresee. Modern life is both complex and intense, and the tremendous changes wrought by the extraordinary industrial development of the last half century are felt in every fiber of our social and political being. Never before have men tried so vast and formidable an experiment as that of administering the affairs of a continent under the forms of a Democratic republic. The conditions which have told for our marvelous material well-being, which have developed to a very high degree our energy, self-reliance, and individual initiative, have also brought the care and anxiety inseparable from the accumulation of great wealth in industrial centers. Upon the success of our experiment much depends, not only as regards our own welfare, but as regards the welfare of mankind. If we fail, the cause of free self-government throughout the world will rock to its foundations, and therefore our responsibility is heavy, to ourselves, to the world as it is to-day, and to the generations yet unborn. There is no good reason why we should fear the future, but there is every reason why we should face it seriously, neither hiding from ourselves the gravity of the problems before us nor fearing to approach these problems with the unbending, unflinching purpose to solve them aright.

Yet, after all, though the problems are new, though the tasks set before us differ from the tasks set before our fathers who founded and preserved this Republic, the spirit in which these tasks must be undertaken and these problems faced, if our duty is to be well done, remains essentially unchanged. We know that self-government is difficult. We know that no people needs such high traits of character as that people which seeks to govern its affairs aright through the freely expressed will of the freemen who compose it. But we have faith that we shall not prove false to the memories of the men of the mighty past. They did their work, they left us the splendid heritage we now enjoy. We in our turn have an assured confidence that we shall be able to leave this heritage unwasted and enlarged to our children and our children’s children. To do so we must show, not merely in great crises, but in the everyday affairs of life, the qualities of practical intelligence, of courage, of hardihood, and endurance, and above all the power of devotion to a lofty ideal, which made great the men who founded this Republic in the days of Washington, which made great the men who preserved this Republic in the days of Abraham Lincoln.

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Pirates, ghost towns and shipwrecks

Posted by quotes on August 13, 2006

Pirates, ghost towns and shipwrecks

August 13, 2006  By Bill Rozday

Special to The News-PostIt rises like a green tent with a domed roof, its fabric a dense weave of live oak branches. Occasionally a clear puncture admits the bright light reflecting off Pamlico Sound, but the rising foundation of sand remains invisible.
This tent of forested land was once the campsite of Blackbeard, the famous pirate.–A temporary home, as all were for pirates, it still stands after nearly 300 years, the modest dimensions of the wind-trimmed trees belying their antiquity.

Cedar, wood of canvas-and-pole tents, holds up this bluff as well, eastern red cedar facing down the offshore winds just as its counterpart western red cedar confronts the coastal climate of the Pacific.– Centuries old, the cedars stand there with limbs that look like the arms or legs of the famous people who slept and laughed here under them.

Blackbeard, an Englishman formally named Edward Teach, relaxed under these trees in a summit of noted pirates convened in November 1718, not realizing this was his last encampment.–Known throughout the Caribbean and Southeast coasts, Teach’s name circulated in government circles as well and led the governor of Virginia to send a detachment of sailors to confront him.–Just offshore, he died in a sword-and-pistol battle that killed some 20 other pirates and sailors.
 

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Famous People – SAVING THE BIRDS – Abraham Lincoln

Posted by quotes on August 3, 2006

Famous People – SAVING THE BIRDS – Abraham Lincoln

By James Baldwin

One day in spring four men were riding on horseback along a country
road. These men were lawyers, and they were going to the next town to
attend court.

There had been a rain, and the ground was very soft. Water was dripping
from the trees, and the grass was wet.

The four lawyers rode along, one behind another; for the pathway was
narrow, and the mud on each side of it was deep. They rode slowly, and
talked and laughed and were very jolly.

As they were passing through a grove of small trees, they heard a great
fluttering over their heads and a feeble chirping in the grass by the
roadside.

“Stith! stith! stith!” came from the leafy branches above them.

“Cheep! cheep! cheep!” came from the wet grass.

“What is the matter here?” asked the first lawyer, whose name was
Speed. “Oh, it’s only some old robins!” said the second lawyer, whose
name was Hardin. “The storm has blown two of the little ones out of
the nest. They are too young to fly, and the mother bird is making a
great fuss about it.”

“What a pity! They’ll die down there in the grass,” said the third
lawyer, whose name I forget.

“Oh, well! They’re nothing but birds,” said Mr. Hardin. “Why should
we bother?”

“Yes, why should we?” said Mr. Speed.

The three men, as they passed, looked down and saw the little birds
fluttering in the cold, wet grass. They saw the mother robin flying
about, and crying to her mate.

Then they rode on, talking and laughing as before. In a few minutes
they had forgotten about the birds.

But the fourth lawyer, whose name was Abraham Lincoln, stopped. He got
down from his horse and very gently took the little ones up in his big
warm hands.

They did not seem frightened, but chirped softly, as if they knew they
were safe.

“Never mind, my little fellows,” said Mr. Lincoln “I will put you in
your own cozy little bed.”

Then he looked up to find the nest from which they had fallen. It was
high, much higher than he could reach.

But Mr. Lincoln could climb. He had climbed many a tree when he was
a boy. He put the birds softly, one by one, into their warm little
home. Two other baby birds were there, that had not fallen out. All
cuddled down together and were very happy.

Soon the three lawyers who had ridden ahead stopped at a spring to
give their horses water.

“Where is Lincoln?” asked one.

All were surprised to find that he was not with them.

“Do you remember those birds?” said Mr. Speed. “Very likely he has
stopped to take care of them.”

In a few minutes Mr. Lincoln joined them. His shoes were covered with
mud; he had torn his coat on the thorny tree.

“Hello, Abraham!” said Mr. Hardin. “Where have you been?”

“I stopped a minute to give those birds to their mother,” he answered.

“Well, we always thought you were a hero,” said Mr. Speed. “Now we
know it.”

Then all three of them laughed heartily. They thought it so foolish
that a strong man should take so much trouble just for some worthless
young birds.

“Gentlemen,” said Mr. Lincoln, “I could not have slept to-night, if
I had left those helpless little robins to perish in the wet grass.”

Abraham Lincoln afterwards became very famous as a lawyer and
statesman. He was elected president. Next to Washington he was the
greatest American.

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So I’m Searching For Things About Famous People and I …

Posted by quotes on August 2, 2006

So I’m Searching For Things About Famous People and I stumble upon this article screaming:

Famous People From T.V.

Want To Hear From Firemen,

P.T.A. Moms;

You Know, People Like You

teamdb.jpgYou’re smart and hip, right? The kind of person whom your friends ask about the latest restaurants, what movies to see, or how to invest their 401ks? Of course you are. Well, whether you know it or not, you’re an “Opinion Driver,” and there’s a new online community for you! It’s called HOTSOUP.com

I can’t really tell much about what it is or is going to be in October 2006 from the actual web site so I guess we will have to wait and see what comes of it.

Oh wait – I just read a recent press release – it is full of gobbledegook doublespeak.

Wow, we really need to build a community to promote that.

Posted in Celebrities, Famous People, People, Research | Leave a Comment »

So I’m Searching For Things About Famous People and I …

Posted by quotes on August 2, 2006

So I’m Searching For Things About Famous People and I stumble upon this article screaming:

Famous People From T.V.

Want To Hear From Firemen,

P.T.A. Moms;

You Know, People Like You

teamdb.jpgYou’re smart and hip, right? The kind of person whom your friends ask about the latest restaurants, what movies to see, or how to invest their 401ks? Of course you are. Well, whether you know it or not, you’re an “Opinion Driver,” and there’s a new online community for you! It’s called HOTSOUP.com

I can’t really tell much about what it is or is going to be in October 2006 from the actual web site so I guess we will have to wait and see what comes of it.

Posted in Famous People, Opinion Driver, People, Research | Leave a Comment »