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Archive for October, 2006

PEOPLE Magazine Unveils Its First-Ever Country Music Special Issue

Posted by quotes on October 23, 2006

PEOPLE Magazine Unveils Its First-Ever Country Music Special Issue

PEOPLE recently published its first-ever Country Music Special Issue, a newsstand-only edition dedicated to the country music scene. The issue profiles the hottest country stars – including Faith Hill, Tim McGraw, Kenny Chesney and Gretchen Wilson among others – and provides a behind-the-scenes look at their lives, careers and romances.

Live Interview With Cynthia Sanz For A Rare Look Inside The Lives Of Country’s Hottest Stars


PEOPLE Magazine recently published its first-ever Country Music Special Issue, a newsstand-only edition dedicated to the country music scene. The issue profiles the hottest country stars – including Faith Hill, Tim McGraw, Kenny Chesney and Gretchen Wilson among others – and provides a behind-the-scenes look at their lives, careers and romances. Plus, PEOPLE’s Country Music Special offers readers a rare look inside the homes and tour buses of their favorite country stars.
PEOPLE’s Country Music special issue coincides with the 40th Annual Country Music Awards on November 6 and will be available on newsstands for four weeks beginning Friday, October 13.

TALENT/GUEST: Cynthia Sanz – Assistant Managing Editor for PEOPLE

Cynthia Sanz was named assistant managing editor for PEOPLE magazine in October 2005. She had been a senior editor at PEOPLE since January 2000, helping to oversee coverage of the entertainment world – as well as a variety of human interest stories. Sanz joined PEOPLE in 1989 as a staff writer on the show biz beat. She was a member of the team that launched PEOPLE en Español and spent four years writing and editing for PEOPLE’s special issues – including the annual features on “The Best & Worst Dressed,” “The Sexiest Man Alive” and “The 50 Most Beautiful People in the World.” In the spring of 2003, she edited the special newsstand-only extra, “The Secrets of American Idol.”

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Posted in Celebrities, Celebrity, Country Music, Cynthia Sanz, Faith Hill, Famous, Famous People, Gretchen Wilson, Kenny Chesney, Music, Opinion Driver, People, People Magazine, Quotes, Speeches, Tim McGraw | 1 Comment »

“Grey’s Anatomy” Star Chandra Wilson Helps Donate Half-a-Million Dollars for Charity

Posted by quotes on October 23, 2006

“Grey’s Anatomy” Star Chandra Wilson Helps Donate Half-a-Million Dollars for Charity

Chandra Wilson, otherwise known as Dr. Miranda Bailey on the hit television show “Grey’s Anatomy,” is leading Bounty’s Cards That Count program along with three worthy charities – the American Cancer Society(R), the Make-A-Wish Foundation(R) and the National Breast Cancer Foundation(R).

Chandra Wilson, otherwise known as Dr. Miranda Bailey on the hit television show “Grey’s Anatomy,” is leading Bounty’s Cards That Count program along with three worthy charities – the American Cancer Society®, the Make-A-Wish Foundation® and the National Breast Cancer Foundation®.

In celebration of Bounty’s 40th birthday, Cards That Count is a program that allows everyone to celebrate, support and vote for their favorite charity by sending free birthday or all occasion e-cards to friends, family or loved ones. Wilson’s own personal story of supporting her seven female family members with life-threatening illnesses has compelled her to play an active role in helping others.

Wilson worked closely with the three participating charities to co-design special e-cards. Each e-card sent translates into a ‘vote’ for the charity of your choice. The more cards sent, the more votes the charity receives. Bounty will allocate donations to the three charities based on the percentage of e-cards sent in support of each charity. Get more information at www.quickerpickerupper.com 
 

Posted in American Cancer Society, Celebrities, Chandra Wilson, Charity, Famous, Famous People, Grey's Anatomy, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Miranda Bailey, National Breast Cancer Foundation, People | Leave a Comment »

Famous People – Steve “Crocodile Hunter” Irwin (1962 – 2006)

Posted by quotes on October 22, 2006

Famous People – Steve “Crocodile Hunter” Irwin (1962 – 2006)

Steve “Crocodile Hunter” Irwin (1962 – 2006) – Find A Grave Memorial

Irwin, Steve ‘Crocodile Hunter’  b. February 22, 1962  d. September 4, 2006Naturalist, Conservationist, Adventurer, TV Personality. Born in Essendon, Melbourne, Australia. Known as the “Crocodile Hunter” on various television shows and in his home land of Australia and known for the saying “Crikey.” He was in the midst of filming an underwater documentary off the coast of Port Douglas, Queensland, when he passed away. His parents, Bob and Lyn, sparked his interest in exotic animals, while they ran the “Queensland Reptile and Fauna Park,” and it was then, as a nine-… (Bio by: *~Civil War Belle~*) Cause of death: Sting to the heart by a stingray barb

Steve Irwin Quotes

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Inaugural Addresses of some of the US Presidents

Posted by quotes on October 19, 2006

Famous Speeches – Herbert Hoover – Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

THIS occasion is not alone the administration of the most sacred oath which can be assumed by an American citizen. It is a dedication and consecration under God to the highest office in service of our people. I assume this trust in the humility of knowledge that only through the guidance of Almighty Providence can I hope to discharge its ever-increasing burdens.

It is in keeping with tradition throughout our history that I should express simply and directly the opinions which I hold concerning some of the matters of present importance.
Famous Speeches – Calvin Coolidge – Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

NO one can contemplate current conditions without finding much that is satisfying and still more that is encouraging. Our own country is leading the world in the general readjustment to the results of the great conflict. Many of its burdens will bear heavily upon us for years, and the secondary and indirect effects we must expect to experience for some time. But we are beginning to comprehend more definitely what course should be pursued, what remedies ought to be applied, what actions should be taken for our deliverance, and are clearly manifesting a determined will faithfully and conscientiously to adopt these methods of relief. Already we have sufficiently rearranged our domestic affairs so that confidence has returned, business has revived, and we appear to be entering an era of prosperity which is gradually reaching into every part of the Nation. Realizing that we can not live unto ourselves alone, we have contributed of our resources and our counsel to the relief of the suffering and the settlement of the disputes among the European nations. Because of what America is and what America has done, a firmer courage, a higher hope, inspires the heart of all humanity.

Famous Speeches – Warren G. Harding – Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

WHEN one surveys the world about him after the great storm, noting the marks of destruction and yet rejoicing in the ruggedness of the things which withstood it, if he is an American he breathes the clarified atmosphere with a strange mingling of regret and new hope. We have seen a world passion spend its fury, but we contemplate our Republic unshaken, and hold our civilization secure. Liberty—liberty within the law—and civilization are inseparable, and though both were threatened we find them now secure; and there comes to Americans the profound assurance that our representative government is the highest expression and surest guaranty of both.

Standing in this presence, mindful of the solemnity of this occasion, feeling the emotions which no one may know until he senses the great weight of responsibility for himself, I must utter my belief in the divine inspiration of the founding fathers. Surely there must have been God’s intent in the making of this new-world Republic. Ours is an organic law which had but one ambiguity, and we saw that effaced in a baptism of sacrifice and blood, with union maintained, the Nation supreme, and its concord inspiring. We have seen the world rivet its hopeful gaze on the great truths on which the founders wrought. We have seen civil, human, and religious liberty verified and glorified. In the beginning the Old World scoffed at our experiment; today our foundations of political and social belief stand unshaken, a precious inheritance to ourselves, an inspiring example of freedom and civilization to all mankind. Let us express renewed and strengthened devotion, in grateful reverence for the immortal beginning, and utter our confidence in the supreme fulfillment.

Famous Speeches – Woodrow Wilson – Second Inaugural Address

My Countrymen:

WHEN one surveys the world about him after the great storm, noting the marks of destruction and yet rejoicing in the ruggedness of the things which withstood it, if he is an American he breathes the clarified atmosphere with a strange mingling of regret and new hope. We have seen a world passion spend its fury, but we contemplate our Republic unshaken, and hold our civilization secure. Liberty—liberty within the law—and civilization are inseparable, and though both were threatened we find them now secure; and there comes to Americans the profound assurance that our representative government is the highest expression and surest guaranty of both.

Standing in this presence, mindful of the solemnity of this occasion, feeling the emotions which no one may know until he senses the great weight of responsibility for himself, I must utter my belief in the divine inspiration of the founding fathers. Surely there must have been God’s intent in the making of this new-world Republic. Ours is an organic law which had but one ambiguity, and we saw that effaced in a baptism of sacrifice and blood, with union maintained, the Nation supreme, and its concord inspiring. We have seen the world rivet its hopeful gaze on the great truths on which the founders wrought. We have seen civil, human, and religious liberty verified and glorified. In the beginning the Old World scoffed at our experiment; today our foundations of political and social belief stand unshaken, a precious inheritance to ourselves, an inspiring example of freedom and civilization to all mankind. Let us express renewed and strengthened devotion, in grateful reverence for the immortal beginning, and utter our confidence in the supreme fulfillment.

 Famous Speeches – Woodrow Wilson – First Inaugural Address

THERE has been a change of government. It began two years ago, when the House of Representatives became Democratic by a decisive majority. It has now been completed. The Senate about to assemble will also be Democratic. The offices of President and Vice-President have been put into the hands of Democrats. What does the change mean? That is the question that is uppermost in our minds to-day. That is the question I am going to try to answer, in order, if I may, to interpret the occasion.

It means much more than the mere success of a party. The success of a party means little except when the Nation is using that party for a large and definite purpose. No one can mistake the purpose for which the Nation now seeks to use the Democratic Party. It seeks to use it to interpret a change in its own plans and point of view. Some old things with which we had grown familiar, and which had begun to creep into the very habit of our thought and of our lives, have altered their aspect as we have latterly looked critically upon them, with fresh, awakened eyes; have dropped their disguises and shown themselves alien and sinister. Some new things, as we look frankly upon them, willing to comprehend their real character, have come to assume the aspect of things long believed in and familiar, stuff of our own convictions. We have been refreshed by a new insight into our own life.

More Presidential Quotes

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Famous People – Paul Revere – THE MIDNIGHT RIDE

Posted by quotes on October 19, 2006

Famous People – Paul Revere – THE MIDNIGHT RIDE

From: Fifty Famous People

A BOOK OF SHORT STORIES

BY JAMES BALDWIN

THE MIDNIGHT RIDE

    Listen, my children, and you shall hear
    Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere.
                  Longfellow.

The midnight ride of Paul Revere happened a long time ago when this
country was ruled by the king of England.

There were thousands of English soldiers in Boston. The king had sent
them there to make the people obey his unjust laws. These soldiers
guarded the streets of the town; they would not let any one go out or
come in without their leave.

The people did not like this. They said, “We have a right to be free
men, but the king treats us as slaves. He makes us pay taxes and gives
us nothing in return. He sends soldiers among us to take away our
liberty.”

The whole country was stirred up. Brave men left their homes and
hurried toward Boston.

They said, “We do not wish to fight against the king, but we are free
men, and he must not send soldiers to oppress us. If the people of
Boston must fight for their liberty, we will help them.”
These men were not afraid of the king’s soldiers. Some of them camped
in Charlestown, [Footnote: Charles’town.] a village near Boston. From
the hills of Charlestown they could watch and see what the king’s
soldiers were doing.

They wished to be ready to defend themselves, if the soldiers should
try to do them harm. For this reason they had bought some powder and
stored it at Concord,[Footnote: Concord (_pro_. kong’krd).] nearly
twenty miles away.

When the king’s soldiers heard about this powder, they made up their
minds to go out and get it for themselves.

Among the watchers at Charlestown was a brave young man named Paul
Revere. He was ready to serve his country in any way that he could.

One day a friend of his who lived in Boston came to see him. He came
very quietly and secretly, to escape the soldiers.

“I have something to tell you,” he said. “Some of the king’s soldiers
are going to Concord to get the powder that is there. They are getting
ready to start this very night.”

“Indeed!” said Paul Revere. “They shall get no powder, if I can help
it. I will stir up all the farmers between here and Concord, and those
fellows will have a hot time of it. But you must help me.”

“I will do all that I can,” said his friend.

“Well, then,” said Paul Revere, “you must go back to Boston and watch.
Watch, and as soon as the soldiers are ready to start, hang a lantern
in the tower of the old North Church. If they are to cross the river,
hang two. I will be here, ready. As soon as I see the light, I will
mount my horse and ride out to give the alarm.”

And so it was done.

When night came, Paul Revere was at the riverside with his horse. He
looked over toward Boston. He knew where the old North Church stood,
but he could not see much in the darkness.

Hour after hour he stood and watched. The town seemed very still; but
now and then he could hear the beating of a drum or the shouting of
some soldier.

The moon rose, and by its light he could see the dim form of the church
tower, far away. He heard the clock strike ten. He waited and watched.

The clock struck eleven. He was beginning to feel tired. Perhaps the
soldiers had given up their plan.

He walked up and down the river bank, leading his horse behind him;
but he kept his eyes turned always toward the dim, dark spot which he
knew was the old North Church.

All at once a light flashed out from the tower. “Ah! there it is!” he
cried. The soldiers had started.

He spoke to his horse. He put his foot in the stirrup. He was ready
to mount.

Then another light flashed clear and bright by the side of the first
one. The soldiers would cross the river.

Paul Revere sprang into the saddle. Like a bird let loose, his horse
leaped forward. Away they went.

Away they went through the village street and out upon the country
road. “Up! up!” shouted Paul Revere. “The soldiers are coming! Up! up!
and defend yourselves!”

[Illustration]

The cry awoke the farmers; they sprang from their beds and looked out.
They could not see the speeding horse, but they heard the clatter of
its hoofs far down the road, and they understood the cry, “Up! up! and
defend yourselves!”

“It is the alarm! The redcoats are coming,” they said to each other.
Then they took their guns, their axes, anything they could find, and
hurried out.

So, through the night, Paul Revere rode toward Concord. At every
farmhouse and every village he repeated his call.

The alarm quickly spread. Guns were fired. Bells were rung. The people
for miles around were roused as though a fire were raging.

The king’s soldiers were surprised to find everybody awake along the
road. They were angry because their plans had been discovered.

When they reached Concord, they burned the courthouse there.

At Lexington, not far from Concord, there was a sharp fight in which
several men were killed. This, in history, is called the Battle of
Lexington. It was the beginning of the war called the Revolutionary
War. But the king’s soldiers did not find the gunpowder. They were
glad enough to march back without it. All along the road the farmers
were waiting for them. It seemed as if every man in the country was
after them. And they did not feel themselves safe until they were once
more in Boston.

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